Common Hereditary Cancer Diseases Screen_icon_20171008-21t

Common Hereditary Cancer Diseases Screen

We all inherit our genes from our parents. Some of these genes protect us from developing certain types of cancer. Sometimes we inherit an irregular version of one of these genes and this is known as a mutation. Genetic mutations can have harmful, beneficial, neutral (no effect), or uncertain effects on our health. Harmful mutations can increase our susceptibility to developing diseases such as breast, ovarian, uterine, colon or pancreatic cancers. If you have immediate family members who have developed cancer or a strong history of cancer exists in your family over several generations, you may have a hereditary cancer predisposition.

Product Description

Common Hereditary Cancer Diseases Screen

All about hereditary cancer risk

We all inherit our genes from our parents. Some of these genes protect us from developing certain types of cancer. Sometimes we inherit an irregular version of one of these genes and this is known as a mutation. Genetic mutations can have harmful, beneficial, neutral (no effect), or uncertain effects on our health. Harmful mutations can increase our susceptibility to developing diseases such as breast, ovarian, uterine, colon or pancreatic cancers. If you have immediate family members who have developed cancer or a strong history of cancer exists in your family over several generations, you may have a hereditary cancer predisposition.
Our genetics are not the only cause of cancer. There are numerous other factors which can influence the development of the disease, such as lifestyle, environment, diet, advancing age, and exposure to toxic substances. Breast cancer is the most common cancer occurring in the developed world, and statistics tell us that one in eight women will develop breast cancer at some point during their lifetime. Around 5-10% of female breast cancers and approximately 25% of all ovarian cancers are due to hereditary genetic mutations.

What does a positive result mean to me?

A positive test result means that the laboratory found a specific genetic alteration that is associated with hereditary cancer. A positive test result does not mean that you have cancer, nor does it mean that you will develop cancer. It simply means that your risk is greater than the “average” individual. You should discuss your test results and questions related to the results with your doctor.
Together you can develop a strategy to lower your risk, which may include earlier or more frequent screening checks.

And if my result is negative?

A negative test result means that the laboratory did not find any specific genetic alterations related to a hereditary predisposition for cancer in the genes that were included in this test. If any of your family members have known hereditary genetic mutations in these genes, this result means that that you have not inherited these mutations. It is important to understand that a negative result does not guarantee that you will never develop cancer, since numerous factors in addition to your genetics are involved in the development of disease.

What is common Cancer Diseaes full gene screen ?

Our Genetic laboratory in the US (Altanta) will examine your inherited gene mutations in 32 individual genes that may increase the risk more than 8 common cancer diseases such as breast, colorectal, gastric, prostate etc .
Your test report lists ONLY the mutations that are thought to increase risk and does not include mutations that are likely benign (not harmful). The test is simple and involves a DNA sample taken by swabbing the inside of your cheeks.

How reliable is the test?

Our test utilizes leading-edge diagnostic technology called Next Generation Sequencing, which is an extremely precise and sensitive method of analyzing genes and identifying irregularities.
The test is carried out by a CLIA accredited Genetic laboratory, an innovative, high technology laboratory with many years of experience in clinical patient service, offering dependable results and information you and your doctor can use to assist with your healthcare decisions