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Cardiac Protection Genetic Test

Coronary Artery disease is one of the leading causes of death in china, followed by cancer. According to US CDC (Centre for Disease Control), cardiovascular disease is also the leading cause of death of men and women in the United States. Factors including hereditary and family history, nutrition and lifestyle, hypertension, high lipids and cholesterol etc, will increase the risk for cardiovascular diseases.

Product Description

Cardiac Protection Genetic Test

Coronary Artery disease is one of the leading causes of death in china, followed by cancer. According to US CDC (Centre for Disease Control), cardiovascular disease is also the leading cause of death of men and women in the United States. Factors including hereditary and family history, nutrition and lifestyle, hypertension, high lipids and cholesterol etc, will increase the risk for cardiovascular diseases. A person’s unique genetic makeup will also impact their responses to drugs eg. dosage, side effects etc. Cardiac Protection Genetic Test is conducted a CAP and CLIA accredited genetic laboratory in California US.

The Three Most Common Cardiovascular Diseases at a Glance

Atrial fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia. This heart condition is the leading cause of arrhythmia-related hospitalizations and can contribute to stroke. Risk factors for AF include age, diabetes, hypertension and heart failure. Research indicates that genetic factors are also associated with AF.

Coronary artery disease

Coronary artery disease (CAD), also known as coronary heart disease, is the leading cause of death in the U.S. Risk factors for CAD are numerous, but family history is a major one. If both parents have CAD early in their lives, the children are 5 times more prone to getting CAD compared to normal parents. Research indicates that multiple genetic factors are associated with the CAD.

Myocardial infarction

Myocardial infarction (MI) kills approximately half a million people in the U.S. each year.1 Symptoms of this condition include chest pain, shortness of breath and other symptoms. Risk factors include a family history of MI, diabetes, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia. Research indicates that genetic factors are also associated with MI.